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Yosemite National Park Thursday, July 12th, 2018

Daily Report - Yosemite National Park
Thursday, July 12th, 2018
 
Today: Mostly cloudy. Slight chance of showers in the morning. Chance of showers and slight chance of thunderstorms in the afternoon. Near the crest, showers likely and slight chance of thunderstorms in the afternoon. Chance of precipitation 50 percent. Highs 80 to 88 at 5000 feet...69 to 75 at 8000 feet.
Tonight: Mostly cloudy. Chance of showers and slight chance of thunderstorms in the evening. Near the crest, slight chance of showers after midnight. Chance of precipitation 50 percent. Lows 63 to 71 at 5000 feet...51 to 59 at 8000 feet.
Friday: Slight chance of showers in the morning. Chance of showers and slight chance of thunderstorms in the afternoon. Near the crest, showers likely and slight chance of thunderstorms in the afternoon. Chance of precipitation 70 percent. Highs 80 to 88 at 5000 feet...69 to 75 at 8000 feet.
 
Additional Point Forecast Weather Links:
 
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NEW AND HAPPENING TODAY
 
Yosemite National Park Employees Receive Department of the Interior Valor Award - Yosemite News Release July 11, 2018
 
Park Rangers Jesse McGahey and Philip N. Johnson, and Firefighter Nick Bliss recognized for heroic actions, courage, and professionalism
 
Three Yosemite National Park employees were honored on July 4th by Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke at the 73rd Honor Award Convocation Ceremony in Washington, D.C. Park Ranger Jesse McGahey, Park Ranger Philip N. Johnson, and Firefighter/Paramedic Nick Bliss received the Valor Award of the Department of the Interior for heroic actions, courage, and professionalism exhibited in the line of duty.
 
On September 27, 2017, the park received a 911 call of climbers injured in a catastrophic rockfall event originating from the South side of El Capitan. Due to a high potential of additional rockfall events off of El Capitan, Park Ranger McGahey was inserted to the scene of the injured parties via helicopter short haul and was the first Ranger and Park Medic on scene. One patient had been helped out of the zone of immediate danger from an additional rockfall. Ranger McGahey worked to stabilize and package the patient, who was suffering from life-threatening injuries. 
 
Another injured climber was still in the zone of immediate danger from another rockfall event. Park Ranger Johnson and Firefighter/Paramedic Bliss were inserted into the rockfall zone via short haul to assess and treat the second patient. This patient had succumbed to his injuries, but the rescuers were able to extract and rescue his body before an additional rockfall came down.  
 
Ranger McGahey, Ranger Johnson, and Firefighter Bliss entered an unpredictable rockfall zone at the base of El Capitan at great personal risk in order to provide medical aid, rescue and recover their patients.
 
“Park Rangers and Firefighters perform courageous acts that often save the lives of park visitors,” stated Chief Ranger Kevin Killian. “The critical actions, performed professionally under unpredictable and dangerous conditions by Jesse, Philip, and Nick on September 27 were instrumental in saving a life. We are extremely proud to have these three distinguished individuals as part of the Yosemite National Park staff.”
 
The Valor Award is presented to Department of the Interior employees who have demonstrated unusual courage involving a high degree of personal risk in the face of danger. The act of heroism is not required to be related to official duties or to have occurred at the official duty station. Recipients receive a special certificate and citation signed by the Secretary and an engraved gold Valor award medal.  (J. Richards)
 
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RECENT NEWS
 
Sierra Nevada Network Summer Newsletter Available
The Sierra Nevada Monitor summer newsletter for the Inventory & Monitoring Program is now available and can be downloaded at http://irma.nps.gov/DataStore/DownloadFile/602564.
 
Learn about: The greening of mountain lakes – Why are some mountain lakes in the Sierra Nevada and the Rocky Mountains showing increased algal growth and what are we doing to understand this issue? iPhone users can download an app to help document these changes when hiking to mountain lakes.  (L. Mutch)
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Scenic Vista Work Plan Available Online
The Scenic Vista Management Plan reestablishes and maintains Yosemite National Park's iconic views, protects meadows and black oak woodlands. Tree trimming and removal will occur at several locations identified in the Scenic Vista Management workplan available online https://www.nps.gov/yose/getinvolved/sv-info.htm    Work this year will occur at notable iconic vistas such as Valley View, various views of Bridalveil Fall and El Capitan. Please watch for workers and give them space. Contact Garrett Dickman garrett_dickman@nps.gov 379-3282 with questions or comments.  (G. Dickman)
 
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CONSTRUCTION & TRAFFIC DELAYS
 
Art Activity Center
From late June through mid-July,  wetland restoration is occurring at the site of the demolished Art Activity Center to return less than 1 acre of seasonal wetland at the former building site. Crew will be re-shaping the topography of the wetland area and replacing the construction fencing with split rail fencing in July, then planting native plants in autumn.
 
Sentinel Meadow Boardwalk
From late June through mid-July, riverbank restoration is occurring in Sentinel Meadow in a less than 0.25 acre area. Crew will add fences to protect unstable riverbanks, protect vegetation, and define a viewing area of Yosemite Falls in July, then plant native plants in autumn. Portions of boardwalk will be temporarily closed for repair and safety
 
Ahwahnee Meadow
From mid-July to early September, wetland restoration will occur at the southwest corner of Ahwahnee Meadow, to improve hydrology, native plant communities, and wildlife habitat in a less than 5 acre area. Staff will use heavy equipment to remove about 800-1,200 cubic yards of imported fill and contour the site for uninterrupted water flow. Staff will broadcast native seed and mulch in the area in autumn. The project is highly visible to the public and to Aramark staff housing.  (G. Dickman)